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“When it is made, sip it slowly…August suns are shining. The breath of the South wind is upon you. It is fragrant, cold and sweet. It is seductive.”

According to An A-Z of Food & Drink, the julep was originally any sweet syrupy drink, often used as a vehicle for medicine. The word julep comes via Arabic julab from Persian gulab, which meat literally rose-water.
One of the earliest accounts took place in 1803 by British traveller John Davis, who mentioned in his book, Travels of Four Years and a Half in the United States of America, drinking a mint julep at a northern Virginia plantation.

Mint juleps date back to at least the early 19th century In his book, Travels of Four Years and a Half in the United States of America, Davis described it as “a dram of spirituous liquor that has mint steeped in it, taken by Virginians of a morning.”

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